Category Archive: Understanding Tools Featured

e-learning resource

An e-learning resource to help health visitors and school nurses improve their understanding of children’s needs

“We are developing a new e-learning resource to help health visitors and school nurses improve their understanding of children’s needs. It has six sections covering emotional wellbeing and mental health issues as well as looking at meeting the needs of children with additional health needs or disabilities.

The resource will be useful for the continuing professional development of both experienced and newly qualified health visitors and school nurses. It will contain information about best practice and self-assessment questions as well as links and suggested further reading for those needing more depth…

It has been created in a partnership between the Community Practitioners and Health Visitors Association (CPHVA), the School and Public Health Nurses Association (SAPHNA), Health Education England, E-learning for Healthcare and Public Health England.”

Viv Bennett, Public Health England’s Chief Nurse. From here

The resource is available via the E-Learning for Healthcare website.

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NHS Choices

NHS Choices website: Young people and mental health

This information hub on the NHS Choices website offers young people advice and help on mental health problems including depression, anxiety and stress.

View it here

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Alnwood Comic

 

Here’s a fun and creative way to present info. This is a comic, which was produced by young people for others coming to the ward: Al goes to Alnwood

 

 

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Sorted! Books

 

Sorted! self-help book collections are available in main public libraries and selected school and college libraries to help young people with specific concerns. The books have been chosen by young people for young people, and are recommended by health professionals. Anyone can use the books, and they are likely to be useful for parents, carers and anyone working with young people.

Source: warwickshire.gov.uk – see it here

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Moodleton

A funky, interactive online guide for young people on all things to do with CAMHS.

Source: covwarkpt.nhs.uk – see it in full here

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Acknowledging students’ psychological state

A ‘traffic light’ method has been successfully used by several schools that wanted their teachers to gain a greater insight into the psychological state of students at different stages during the day. The hope was that by gaining this — usually hidden — information, teachers would be able to modify their practice in order to help students to enjoy a better climate for learning and thereby enter their Effective Learning Zone.

The system works by every teacher being issued with green, amber and red traffic light symbols for student use. When prompted, students hold up the traffic light that best sums up how ready they feel to learn. This gives them an immediate and confidential way to give feedback to the teacher about their readiness for learning.

From ‘Creative Teaching and Learning Toolkit’ by Brin Best & Will Thomas (2007) Read more here

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‘Passport’ style brief of young people’s mental health

NHS England: ‘Passport’ style brief of young people’s mental health launched

A ‘passport’ style brief of key facts that children and young people using mental health services can use to help them avoid repeating their history and preferences has been launched.

The ‘passport’ idea, which includes clinical information as well as key personal preferences, has been developed by young people, parents and carers and can now be used across care settings either on paper or on mobile phones.

The idea came from a group of young people, parents, carers and professionals working with NHS England on improving integration between services. The group highlighted their frustrations about needing to repeat their history when accessing multiple services.

Find out more here

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MindEd

MindEd is a free educational resource on children and young people’s mental health for all adults.

The MindEd Core Curriculum is aimed at all adults working as professionals or volunteers with children and young people. It offers e-learning to inform about the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people, what goes wrong and what can be done to help.

The ‘Specialist CAMHS Entry Level’ part of the curriculum is aimed at anyone starting to work in child mental health. It introduces some of the major presentations seen in specialist and targeted CAMHS and describes the processes involved in specialist CAMHS assessments. More advanced users will also find topics of interest.

View it here: minded.org.uk

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High risk groups

High risk groups

Groups at higher risk than their peers for mental health problems include:

  • Young offenders and children from a criminal background.
  • Children who are being looked after by local authorities or who have recently ended a period of public care.
  • Children with learning difficulties.
  • Children with emotional and behavioural difficulties.
  • Children who have been sexually, physically or emotionally abused.
  • Children with a chronic physical illness.
  • Children with a physical disability.
  • Children with sensory impairments.
  • Children of parents with mental illness.
  • Children of parents with a substance abuse problem.
  • Children who have experienced or witnessed sudden and extreme trauma.
  • Children who are refugees.

Source: Department of Health – read full guide here

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