Tag Archive: age

Young people have their own specific treatment programme, in an age-appropriate environment. They are helped to take responsibility for themselves and each other on a day to day basis.

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Those visitors under the age of 18 are not permitted to visit without an appropriate adult present.

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The team hold a shared body of expert knowledge on the process of child and adolescent development. This informs age-appropriate interactions and recognition that adolescents are not all at the same developmental trajectory. (from:http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/pdf/Workingwithinchildandadolescentmentalhealthinpat.pdf)

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The ward has an agreed set of bedtimes, according to age.

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Attention needs to be paid to the availability of age-appropriate in-patient resources for older adolescents/young adults (16-25) that appear particularly sparse. (From Young Minds’ Where Next)

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Supporting Young People Online

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Internet safety guide: Supporting Young People Online – Information for Parents and Carers from Childnet International

The internet is an amazing resource which enables children and young people to connect, communicate and be creative in a number of different ways, on a range of devices. However, the internet is always changing, and being able to keep up to date with your children’s use of technology can be a challenge. You may sometimes feel that your children have better technical skills than you do, however children and young people still need advice and protection when it comes to managing their lives online.

Issues that your child may encounter on the internet will vary depending on their age and online activities. We have grouped potential online risks into these 4 categories.

  1. Conduct
  2. Content
  3. Contact
  4. Commercialism

Download the guide here

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The Emotional Thermometer by Alistair Cooper and Sheila Redfern

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A tool for parents. 

What it is..

The Emotional Thermometer is a way of keeping in mind how strong your feelings are at any given moment. Use this thermometer as a gauge of when it’s best to act, and when it might be better to wait.

 

It helps you by…

The Emotional Thermometer helps you become more aware of what you are feeling and how intensely you are experiencing the feeling. This awareness will allow you to find ways to reduce the impact of your feeling and bring you into a calmer state of mind.

 

It helps your child by…

The Emotional Thermometer helps your child because the more regulated you are feeling when you interact with him, the less likely you are of overreacting. Your child will see that you take responsibility for your feelings.

 

It helps your relationship by..

Keeping in mind your emotional thermometer makes it less likely situations will escalate beyond control and will help you to understand your child’s feelings and bring you closer together.

 

Keep in mind…

  1. Use the concept of the emotional thermometer as a gauge of when it’s best to act, and when it might be better to wait.
  2. Notice your thoughts and emotions to develop your ability to be a more reflective parent.
  3. When you start to notice your own feelings, you can then reflect on how you are coming across.
  4. Use friends and networks to help you.
  5. Be accepting of how you feel and how your child feels.
  6. Remember your child is just a child, with a separate and totally different set of thoughts and feelings from you, which represent both his age and the things going on in his life.

 

© 2016 Alistair Cooper and Sheila Redfern.

From Reflective Parenting: A Guide to Understanding What’s Going on in Your Child’s Mind by Alistair Cooper, Sheila Redfern

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Young people encouraged to take active role in local mental health service

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Islington CAMHS is encouraging young people in Islington to take an active role in local mental health services in the borough, by joining their youth board.

Lucy McGregor, lead for user participation, said: “The CAMHS youth board is an exciting opportunity for young people to have their say, make changes and influence decisions about their mental health service. Joining the CAMHS youth board is also an opportunity for young people to develop new skills that will look great on their CV.”

Young people over the age of 13 years who live in Islington are invited to join. Everyone is welcome including current service users, past service users and young people who haven’t used the service but would like to be involved.

The CAMHS youth board meets once a month after school between 4-6pm.

Young people are invited to come along to:

  • Find out more about the CAMHS youth board and developing their skills.
  • Receive training in recruitment.
  • Meet new people.

From here

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Questionnaires and other information gathering tools

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The need for questionnaires and any other information gathering tools to be age-appropriate was stressed by the steering group members.

See YoungMinds’ Where Next

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