Tag Archive: carer

Aim and goal of interventions

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We agree the aim and goal of interventions with the young person or parent/carer, monitor the changes to agreed and shared goals as well as symptoms, and amend therapeutic interactions as a result of these changes, to deliver the best possible outcome. From: england.nhs.uk

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Although the mental health of the young person is the main focus of assessments and interventions, the impact of adult mental health problems in the parent/carer also needs to be considered and understood by staff.

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A lot of young people who are admitted feel very anxious at first, especially because they’re away from their parent or primary carer. Staff begin talking about this with the young person early on and provide lots of reassurance. After some time, they are usually able to engage in activities and conversations with others. An emphasis on positive engagement is crucial, forming a trusting relationship and managing this separation in a considerate and gradual way.

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Providing written information to the young person and parent/carer about the care plan and how to access services (both routinely and in a crisis); this information needs to be clear, easy to understand and jargon free.

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Smooth transitions

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Young people leaving the service have an agreed and documented discharge plan that supports self-management where possible, and explains how to access help if this becomes necessary. Where a young person is moving to another service, whether to adult mental health services or to a different service, staff ensure that the agreed transition protocol is followed. As a minimum, this will involve: a joint meeting between ward staff and the new service that includes the young person and/or parent/carer, and a written discharge summary, followed up after six months to check that the transition has proceeded smoothly.

Source: NHS England, 2-14 – read more here 

To find out more and for tools to help with the commissioning of transition, see CHIMAT CAMHS transitions resources

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Patient involvement in quality improvement: is it time we let children, young people and families take the lead

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A summary: It is vital to involve children, young people and families in the design, delivery and improvement of their care. Their involvement can range from individuals giving feedback, such as patient stories, to collaborative work including patient groups and communities helping to develop and commission services. The methods for involving individuals and families include questionnaires and innovative ideas such as feedback apps. Other methods include the 15 Steps Challenge, which helps an organisation to view the care it delivers through a patient’s eyes and includes a ‘walk around’ involving a patient, carer, staff member and board member. The Experience Based Design approach is another method of reviewing a service and involves assessing how staff and patients feel when delivering and receiving care. Involving patient groups can be facilitated by working with schools and children’s centres. The type of involvement will vary, but if carefully designed, it can allow meaningful participation and improvement of services.

You can read the article in full here

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Distinct sources of information

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These are somewhat distinct sources of information; measures usually capture phenomena that are common to individuals with a particular problem, whereas diary records are a way of helping the parent/carer or child/young person to elaborate on their own idiosyncratic concerns.

From UCL CAMHS Competence model

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Attend appointments without a parent or carer

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Young people can make and attend appointments without a parent or carer. Where the attendance of parents/carers is desirable (for example where specialist services are being delivered), young people are routinely offered at least one consultation on their own.

See more here: Quality criteria for young people friendly health services

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Carer’s perspective

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Younger patients often have very limited ways of talking about their experiences and feelings so a carer’s perspective is required to verbalise a fuller account of the young person’s difficulties.

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