Tag Archive: communicate

What Works to Enhance Inter-Parental Relationships and Improve Outcomes for Children?

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The Early Intervention Foundation have carried out a review of ‘What works to enhance inter-parental relationships and improve outcomes for children.

Key findings include:

  • The quality of the inter-parental relationship, specifically how parents communicate and relate to each other, is increasingly recognised as a primaryinfluence on effective parenting practices and children’s long-term mental health and future life chances.
  • Parents/couples who engage in frequent, intense and poorly resolved inter-parental conflicts put children’s mental health and long-term life chances at risk.
  • Children of all ages can be affected by destructive inter-parental conflict, with effects evidenced across infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood.
  • The context of the wider family environment is an important factor that can protect or exacerbate child outcomes in response to exposure to inter-parental conflict. In particular, levels of negativity and parenting practices can exacerbate or moderate the impact of inter-parental conflict on children.
  • Inter-parental conflict can adversely affect both the mother-child and father-child relationship, with evidence suggesting that the association between inter-parental conflict and negative parenting practices may be stronger for the father-child relationship compared to the mother-child relationship.

http://www.eif.org.uk/

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The ward school communicate frequently with main stream school teachers.

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Working with families requires staff to maintain the involvement of all family members, and to communicate with each of them in a way that is in keeping with their different developmental stages and roles within the family.

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The role of unit staff is critical in affecting a positive culture…Effective training is essential for all staff about how to communicate with children and young people, how to treat them with dignity and respect even when their behaviour is challenging. From:http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmhealth/342/34209.htm

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We support young people in taking positive risks (when initial risks have decreased), such as working with the wider community that allows them to communicate with a different mix of people. This exposes them to new experiences, helps them acquire new skills that they can use when they return home. This sort of thing is great for their CV and future development.

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Supporting Young People Online

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Internet safety guide: Supporting Young People Online – Information for Parents and Carers from Childnet International

The internet is an amazing resource which enables children and young people to connect, communicate and be creative in a number of different ways, on a range of devices. However, the internet is always changing, and being able to keep up to date with your children’s use of technology can be a challenge. You may sometimes feel that your children have better technical skills than you do, however children and young people still need advice and protection when it comes to managing their lives online.

Issues that your child may encounter on the internet will vary depending on their age and online activities. We have grouped potential online risks into these 4 categories.

  1. Conduct
  2. Content
  3. Contact
  4. Commercialism

Download the guide here

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A Feeling and Action Scale

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A Tool for Families: A Feeling and Action Scale

Feeling and Action Scale is a communication tool that can be helpful for the whole family. It allows parents and their child to communicate their feelings and helpful responses in a quick and concise way.

The Feeling and Action Scale is a two-part communication tool. The first part, the Feeling Scale, consists of a range of numbers from 1-5. For each number assigned, the young person also assigns a one-word qualifier to describe how they’re feeling in the moment, or to describe their overall feelings about a situation or event. A 1 on the scale signifies that all is well, while a 5 indicates the young person is experiencing a crisis.

The second part of the scale focuses on actions. The Action Scale is a set of instructions that can help you help the young person when they are dealing with difficult feelings. For each feeling qualifier there should be an action, even if the action is ‘no action’. It’s important to recognise that there should be several action alternatives for each feeling. The ability to implement a specific action will, of course, be dependent on the situation.

The Feeling and Action Scale:

  1. I’m great = No action needed.
  2. I’m fine = No action needed.
  3. I’m so so = I need some alone time in my room.
  4. I’m upset = I need some alone time and then I want to talk with you about what is going on.
  5. I’m in crisis = I need your help.

From: Teenage as a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual (2010) by Dr Barbara R. Greenberg & Dr Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder PsyD. Read more here.

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Young people communicate in various different ways

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“Young people communicate in various different ways, sometimes talking freely about what comes to mind, sometimes drawing, sometimes – especially in the case of younger children – playing, and sometimes showing how they feel by remaining silent.”

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Supportive teams

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When professionals work in supportive teams they are able to offer the support needed by children and young people. This enables staff to join in their roles and offer appropriate care and communicate regularly thus keeping the families feeling safe.

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