Tag Archive: communication

Staff facilitate young people’s communication in various ways: verbally, non-verbally or symbolically, through play and the expressive arts, and provide emotional containment so that they can move on emotionally, socially and educationally.

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Good communication about the young person’s future educational needs must be timed to facilitate appropriate educational provision at discharge.

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Good communication about the young people’s education is vital. The ward school staff are invited to every MDT meeting, including morning handovers. The head master attends management round and ward round on a weekly basis.

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When engaging with families we use skills in communication and collaborative working, we gain feedback, and frequently look out for potential hazards to engagement.

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Calm, clear, simple verbal and non-verbal communication eases tension on the ward.

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Rotation of nursing staff between Tier 3 and Tier 4 – to increase understanding of roles, communication between tiers, and numbers of available nursing staff. (Where Next)

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Rotation of nursing staff between Tier 3 and Tier 4 – to increase understanding of roles, communication between tiers, and numbers of available nursing staff. (Where Next2)

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Good communication between in-patient and community services during a young person’s stay can facilitate them going back to the community at the most appropriate time for them, and not remaining in in-patient care for longer than necessary, provided there are services to support them. (From Young Minds’ Where Next 2)

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A Feeling and Action Scale

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A Tool for Families: A Feeling and Action Scale

Feeling and Action Scale is a communication tool that can be helpful for the whole family. It allows parents and their child to communicate their feelings and helpful responses in a quick and concise way.

The Feeling and Action Scale is a two-part communication tool. The first part, the Feeling Scale, consists of a range of numbers from 1-5. For each number assigned, the young person also assigns a one-word qualifier to describe how they’re feeling in the moment, or to describe their overall feelings about a situation or event. A 1 on the scale signifies that all is well, while a 5 indicates the young person is experiencing a crisis.

The second part of the scale focuses on actions. The Action Scale is a set of instructions that can help you help the young person when they are dealing with difficult feelings. For each feeling qualifier there should be an action, even if the action is ‘no action’. It’s important to recognise that there should be several action alternatives for each feeling. The ability to implement a specific action will, of course, be dependent on the situation.

The Feeling and Action Scale:

  1. I’m great = No action needed.
  2. I’m fine = No action needed.
  3. I’m so so = I need some alone time in my room.
  4. I’m upset = I need some alone time and then I want to talk with you about what is going on.
  5. I’m in crisis = I need your help.

From: Teenage as a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual (2010) by Dr Barbara R. Greenberg & Dr Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder PsyD. Read more here.

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Closing the Gap in Patient Safety programme

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Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust wants to reduce suicide and self-harm among people using community mental health services. They’re using a prospective hazard analysis tool and human factors training, to help staff gain patient safety skills and enable care teams to identify and solve their own safety issues. A key feature will be improving communication skills and team working, in order to strengthen the safety culture, improve service user satisfaction and reduce harm. From here

Read more about the Safer care pathways in mental health services project here

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