Tag Archive: creative

Co-operative work, sharing based activities – for example through creative activities – can act as an equaliser for negative experiences, such as disappointment, despair, destructiveness and violence, which often arise in a CAMHS setting. A weekly group music session or a termly edition of a class magazine, for instance, enables young people to work together while accommodating various levels of individual skill and ability.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Staff help young people find different and more creative ways of ventilating their pain, distress, confusion and outrage.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Art Group is a non-directive group where young people are encouraged to express themselves through a creative medium of their choice e.g. paint, clay, paper, felt tips.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Resolve issues of boredom and of insufficient activities – possibly through the more creative use of existing staff or bringing in staff from outside the unit. (From Young Minds’ Where Next)

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Letting young people take the lead

Read more

“Letting young people take the lead when you do creative play together helps to decrease challenging behaviour.”

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Supporting Young People Online

Read more

Internet safety guide: Supporting Young People Online – Information for Parents and Carers from Childnet International

The internet is an amazing resource which enables children and young people to connect, communicate and be creative in a number of different ways, on a range of devices. However, the internet is always changing, and being able to keep up to date with your children’s use of technology can be a challenge. You may sometimes feel that your children have better technical skills than you do, however children and young people still need advice and protection when it comes to managing their lives online.

Issues that your child may encounter on the internet will vary depending on their age and online activities. We have grouped potential online risks into these 4 categories.

  1. Conduct
  2. Content
  3. Contact
  4. Commercialism

Download the guide here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

CAMHSweb

Read more

The Very Cool CAMHSweb

This online platform includes a number of tools to help young people and their therapist explore their strengths, feelings and relationships, and work on personal goals.

Dr Jessica Austin, Lead Clinical Psychologist with the West Norfolk Family and Young Person’s Service, said: “This exciting project will make a huge difference to the recovery of many young people across West Norfolk, and we are delighted to be taking part in the pilot.

“CAMHSweb is a fantastic tool which helps young people feel more in control of their mental health care.

“It gives them the chance to personalise their treatment and express their thoughts in a variety of different ways. For example, they can doodle their goals and create avatars of the people in their lives, then, using one of the tools they can place them on a target showing how close and how supportive they are to the individual’s recovery.

“It is a very graphical and creative way of helping young people.”

More here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Alnwood Comic

Read more

 

Here’s a fun and creative way to present info. This is a comic, which was produced by young people for others coming to the ward: Al goes to Alnwood

 

 

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Acknowledging students’ psychological state

Read more

A ‘traffic light’ method has been successfully used by several schools that wanted their teachers to gain a greater insight into the psychological state of students at different stages during the day. The hope was that by gaining this — usually hidden — information, teachers would be able to modify their practice in order to help students to enjoy a better climate for learning and thereby enter their Effective Learning Zone.

The system works by every teacher being issued with green, amber and red traffic light symbols for student use. When prompted, students hold up the traffic light that best sums up how ready they feel to learn. This gives them an immediate and confidential way to give feedback to the teacher about their readiness for learning.

From ‘Creative Teaching and Learning Toolkit’ by Brin Best & Will Thomas (2007) Read more here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Activity Coordinators

Read more

Activity Coordinators are in effect therapy assistants. They work within Occupational Therapy and support the Occupational Therapist by contributing to assessments and providing feedback on the young people’s progress. They deliver a programme of therapeutic activities on a one-to-one basis or in groups, including living and social skills, independence and wellbeing, achieving goals, creative therapies, education, recreation and leisure, health and fitness, and cognitive skills like problem solving, to encourage and motivate young people during their stay on the unit.

From withuinmind.nhs.uk

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example