Tag Archive: encourage

There are well-timed behavioural rewards and endorsements built into the ward programme to encourage young people to keep on track. For example, after a session of education or group therapy there is always a break during which the young people have a drink and free time.

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The unit is open seven days a week, although we encourage children to spend weekends at home with their family or carers.

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“…you might give him a journal and encourage daily writing or drawing. This ritual can enhance his ability to pay attention to and understand his internal landscape. Or for a younger child, have her draw pictures that tell a story.” (From The Whole-Brain Child)

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The team aim to encourage self-esteem, to give consistency, and to encourage social adaptation.

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A board and wipe-off markers (or something similar) are provided so that YP can share their thoughts and feelings knowing that they can wipe things away before they leave the groups. Where this is not available, we encourage YP to do the same with a piece of paper so they can rip the paper up prior to leaving the session. We also encourage young people to do this before bed should they have a lot going through their mind.

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“When you ask simple questions that encourage the consideration of another’s feelings, you are building your child’s ability to feel empathy.” (From the book The Whole-Brain Child)

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Not all young people are able to be sociable; sometimes they feel paranoid, or simply used to being alone. We’re always mindful of those who want to be alone a lot and gently encourage them to spend time with others.

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Sometimes a theme is introduced in the art and craft sessions to encourage ideas. Young people are encouraged to discuss their work with an emphasis on emotional issues rather than technique or achieving a perfect piece of art work.

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Imaginal experiences

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If evidence of achievement is yet to be experienced, staff can use ‘imaginal experiences’ to create a desired future image of oneself – one’s Best Possible Self. Encourage the young person to write, or visually create, a future auto-portrait following these instructions:

‘Imagine that you’ve achieved what you aimed for, that your best potentials have come to be realised. Write about and vividly imagine yourself in that future.’

This exercise enhances confidence and optimism, helps achieve a better integration between priorities and goals, and increases happiness. The idea is to make the Best Possible Self tangible enough to encourage actions, to make sure this future self comes true.

Adapted from Boniwell 2015 – read more here

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Ward Community Rules Expectations

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Ward Community Rules Expectations (whereas rules are often one-sided and imposed, expectations are inclusive and promote a culture of mutual respect)

This is an example of an impressive list of social expectations everyone is encouraged to stick to. What’s truly fab about it is that young people themselves, working alongside staff, came up with it. Such an idea-generating activity can be a notably remedial and neutralising activity in its own right:

  • Be respectful to others.
  • No bullying behaviours.
  • Violence to others or property will not be accepted.
  • Attending your education sessions or purposeful activities.
  • Going to bed on time.
  • Looking after your personal hygiene and keeping your bedroom tidy.
  • We expect that everyone, both staff and young people, will treat everyone with respect and encourage positive interaction.
  • Use words to express the feeling or impulse, otherwise the ‘violence’ will be split off or acted out.

Source: tewv.nhs.uk – see more here

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