Tag Archive: environment

The PATHS® curriculum

Read more

The PATHS® curriculum is a comprehensive program that promotes emotional and social competencies, reducing aggression and behavior problems. The curriculum supports educators and counselors in creating an environment that helps children develop self-control, positive self-esteem, emotional awareness, basic problem-solving skills, social skills and friendships.

 

Read more here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Animal-assisted Therapy

Read more

Animals are an important part of many people’s lives — their mere presence can contribute to human’s happiness, making their life more meaningful. However, animals may do more than just provide companionship.

New research suggests they can improve emotional, social and cognitive functioning in adolescents with severe mental disorders. The study, published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, examined the effects of animal-assisted therapy, which is an intervention involving guided interaction between a patient and a trained animal. The purpose of this intervention is to aid a patient’s recovery process.

“The young patients who feel fragile, needy and dependent on others in the hospital context, can experience themselves as caretakers of someone else in the [animal-assisted therapy] environment,” researchers said, according to The Pacific Standard. “This experience can improve their sense of self-agency and self-cure, and these positive effects are not only limited to the human-animal bond, but can be extended to the patient’s global functioning and to the entire process of care.”

Source: medicaldaily.com – Read more here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

What Works to Enhance Inter-Parental Relationships and Improve Outcomes for Children?

Read more

The Early Intervention Foundation have carried out a review of ‘What works to enhance inter-parental relationships and improve outcomes for children.

Key findings include:

  • The quality of the inter-parental relationship, specifically how parents communicate and relate to each other, is increasingly recognised as a primaryinfluence on effective parenting practices and children’s long-term mental health and future life chances.
  • Parents/couples who engage in frequent, intense and poorly resolved inter-parental conflicts put children’s mental health and long-term life chances at risk.
  • Children of all ages can be affected by destructive inter-parental conflict, with effects evidenced across infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood.
  • The context of the wider family environment is an important factor that can protect or exacerbate child outcomes in response to exposure to inter-parental conflict. In particular, levels of negativity and parenting practices can exacerbate or moderate the impact of inter-parental conflict on children.
  • Inter-parental conflict can adversely affect both the mother-child and father-child relationship, with evidence suggesting that the association between inter-parental conflict and negative parenting practices may be stronger for the father-child relationship compared to the mother-child relationship.

http://www.eif.org.uk/

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Creating an accommodating environment in which the young person feels free to ‘act out’ and to gain control over their feelings in safety.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Young people have their own specific treatment programme, in an age-appropriate environment. They are helped to take responsibility for themselves and each other on a day to day basis.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Ward building safety features: there is a safe, low stimulus garden as well as a garden with playground equipment. There is a soft room that is used for time out and physical containment of risky behaviour, but it is also used for fun and rough play. There are high handles to the doors to slow down young people who might be trying to run out of the building. All sharp objects such as knives are kept locked away and staff are continuously monitoring the environment for any item that might be dangerous.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

If a young person finds it difficult in large groups, staff will work with them to understand their unease. We might build a tool box of skills which can be used to confront this in a safe environment. Working towards feeling more socially at ease is often a goal which can continue after they leave the ward.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Staff provide an environment where choices are clear and the day follows a predictable but varied pattern.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Young people are to respect staff, peers, belongings, rights to privacy, the environment, opinions and personal space at all times. And the same goes for staff.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Knowing what you value and where you stand on certain issues as a community helps to build a safe, appropriately-boundaried environment.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example