Tag Archive: expectations

“From a staff perspective, accurate information is seen as valuable in helping parents make realistic expectations about in-patient services.” (See YoungMinds’ Where Next)

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

We conduct an initial family meeting in which we seek out their hopes, concerns and expectations. We contact allocated key family members prior to ward rounds and get them in care plans and so on. There should be no divide between the family and the professionals.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Mobile phone usage

Read more

“Mobile phones can only be used between 6-8pm, at other times they are expected to be kept in a secure space, monitored by nursing staff.”

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Life Skills Group

Read more

“The Life Skills group is run by two staff members. It is an opportunity to think about and explore issues affecting everyday life including topical issues. Some of the subjects that might be explored include bullying, self-esteem, growing up issues, environmental issues, safety and practical day-to-day tasks. The group can also concentrate on topics that the children, parents and team think would be helpful at the time. The children set the expectations of the group, for example: not sharing the information outside the group, respecting each other and listening to what each other has to say. Staff try to make the group fun and interesting, although it can be a tough group when thinking about difficult feelings and experiences.”

Source: gosh.nhs.uk – read more here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Ward Community Rules Expectations

Read more

Ward Community Rules Expectations (whereas rules are often one-sided and imposed, expectations are inclusive and promote a culture of mutual respect)

This is an example of an impressive list of social expectations everyone is encouraged to stick to. What’s truly fab about it is that young people themselves, working alongside staff, came up with it. Such an idea-generating activity can be a notably remedial and neutralising activity in its own right:

  • Be respectful to others.
  • No bullying behaviours.
  • Violence to others or property will not be accepted.
  • Attending your education sessions or purposeful activities.
  • Going to bed on time.
  • Looking after your personal hygiene and keeping your bedroom tidy.
  • We expect that everyone, both staff and young people, will treat everyone with respect and encourage positive interaction.
  • Use words to express the feeling or impulse, otherwise the ‘violence’ will be split off or acted out.

Source: tewv.nhs.uk – see more here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Commitment statements

Read more

 

Here’s an example of a statement which young people developed alongside staff. It clearly sets out expectations so everyone can stay on the same page, including:

Compassion is feeling yourself in someone else’s shoes and thinking about how they feel.

Staff promise to show compassion every day.

Care is looking after yourself, loved ones and others.

Staff promise to take care of you and support you.

Commitment is working hard and finishing what you started.

Staff promise to stick by you every day and put you first.

From here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

The importance of affiliation, structure and autonomy support

Read more

Study: The importance of affiliation, structure and autonomy support

Drawing on decades of evidence linking authoritative parenting to better mental health outcomes for children, a team of Montreal-based psychologists note how warm, nurturing parenting (‘affiliation’) and clear, consistent expectations and discipline (‘structure’) have been acknowledged as key components. But they argue that a third important dimension – parental respect for children’s own ideas, feelings and initiatives (‘autonomy support’) has received less attention than it deserves.

The results of their study showed that parental skills relating to structure and affiliation both increased significantly, following an intervention to introduce autonomy support into the parenting of a group of parents. There was also an increase in positive attitudes towards autonomy support, with parents making more use of relevant strategies. Parents reported that their child’s mental health had significantly improved and that problematic behaviour had reduced. Children’s feedback also suggested that their sense of happiness, self-esteem and life satisfaction had significantly improved too.

You can read more about their work here.

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Collaboration with the young person and family

Read more

Formulations and treatment plans are often constructed in collaboration with the child/young person and family, and the expectation is that they are periodically reviewed in the light of new assessment or intervention information.

 

From UCL CAMHS Competence model

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example