Tag Archive: families

SchoolsPlus

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“Healthcare leaders have recognized that by working together and leveraging their shared knowledge and opportunities they can improve policy, service design and treatment options. For example, our School Plus program is a leading practice in [Canada] and school boards, schools and families are speaking about its strength and value.”

Leo Glavine, provincial health minister in Canada

SchoolsPlus is a collaborative interagency approach supporting the whole child and their family with the school as the center of service delivery.

Learn more: https://schoolsplus.ednet.ns.ca

 

 

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Endings and transitions are typically difficult times for young people, their families, and the ward team involved. Because discharge is as significant as admission, moving forward is an essential part of sensitively managing therapeutic relationships.

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Changes in attitude among staff and those managing the service

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In work with young people and families with such entrenched and complex needs, it may well be necessary to bring about changes in attitude among staff and those managing the service, so as to create sufficient time and space to think about each individual person and case on a recurrent basis. From: england.nhs.uk

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A new community-based Eating Disorder servic

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A new community-based Eating Disorder service will provide new and enhanced community and day treatment for children and young people. The service will work with families and meet the recommended access and waiting time standards – within 24 hours for emergency referrals – within 1 week for urgent cases and within 4 weeks for routine cases. From: yorkshirecoastradio.com

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Wards need to have sufficient capacity and flexibility and their staff need to have the skills to offer an eclectic range of interventions that can meet individual needs, and to involve young people and their families and carers in planning and evaluating the intervention they receive. From: https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/c07-tier4-ch-ado-mh-serv-child.pdf

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Families need to know what they have a right to expect, who is responsible for delivering it and what they can do if they don’t get it. (From:http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmhealth/342/34209.htm)

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All work with young people and their families is rooted in the team’s knowledge of child development.

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There is considerable value in families ‘informal’ reports regarding their problems and any changes they have noticed. However, it is good practice for practitioners to record changes systematically, using measures, questionnaires, or diaries. (UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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Young people are usually reliant on their families to facilitate attendance to appointments, and their involvement in the process from the beginning is important if the young person is to access any treatment especially in an outpatient setting.

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When engaging with families we use skills in communication and collaborative working, we gain feedback, and frequently look out for potential hazards to engagement.

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