Tag Archive: influence

How we respond and relate to the young people on the ward influences their emotions, behaviour and developing personality.

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The influence of peer group could be both positive and negative to the young people in our sample. About a third of young people spoke about the helpful aspects of being part of a group. Some found it supportive to meet other people who had maybe been in similar situations. Others appreciated the chance to keep things more normal by making friends and having a laugh with people. (From YoungMinds’ Where Next 2)

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The Parent Map – by Alistair Cooper and Sheila Redfern

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A tool for parents.

What it is…
The Parent Map is a way of reflecting about yourself and how you parent your child. It encourages you to map out and think about what influences your parenting, such as current feelings, your past experiences and wider influences, such as beliefs and relationships.

It helps you by…
The Parent Map helps you become more aware of yourself and how you relate to your child. It also helps you to be more aware of the difference and separateness of your emotions from your child’s. It helps you identify times when you are more likely to have strong feelings, which can be unhelpful in some situations.

It helps your child by…
The Parent Map helps your child because the more reflective and aware of yourself you are, the more stable your relationship can be. Your child will experience you in a more regulated and considered way.

It helps your relationship by…
The Parent Map makes links between past and present, which helps prevent past negative experiences impacting strongly on how you interact with your child. Your relationship benefits by being more stable and less reactive.

Keep in mind mind…

  1. Think about the need to be aware of yourself.
  2. Think about what influences your parenting, include your thoughts and feelings, the influence of past experiences.
  3. Use strong feelings to trigger self-reflection and make a connection with how this influences your parenting.
  4. Identify times when you think there might be a link between current and past experiences.
  5. Build a story of how you got to feel and think the way you do now:
    1. Did your level of emotional reaction fit the situation?
    2. What do you think may have contributed to you reacting in this way?
    3. How might a friend have experienced you in this situation, what would they have seen?
    4. Can you link your reaction in this situation to previous situations?
  6. Use your awareness of your ‘triggers’ to help guide you during future interactions; imagine, predict and reflect on where and how similar feelings and thoughts may arise.

© 2016 Alistair Cooper and Sheila Redfern.

From: Reflective Parenting: A Guide to Understanding What’s Going on in Your Child’s Mind by Alistair Cooper, Sheila Redfern

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Young people encouraged to take active role in local mental health service

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Islington CAMHS is encouraging young people in Islington to take an active role in local mental health services in the borough, by joining their youth board.

Lucy McGregor, lead for user participation, said: “The CAMHS youth board is an exciting opportunity for young people to have their say, make changes and influence decisions about their mental health service. Joining the CAMHS youth board is also an opportunity for young people to develop new skills that will look great on their CV.”

Young people over the age of 13 years who live in Islington are invited to join. Everyone is welcome including current service users, past service users and young people who haven’t used the service but would like to be involved.

The CAMHS youth board meets once a month after school between 4-6pm.

Young people are invited to come along to:

  • Find out more about the CAMHS youth board and developing their skills.
  • Receive training in recruitment.
  • Meet new people.

From here

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Teenagers in Stockport shape future of mental health services

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Teenagers in Stockport are helping to shape the future of mental health services with a new user forum. It’s hoped the group will influence the future commissioning of young people’s services in the borough. The forum has already shared suggestions including running more group activities and making the consulting rooms more friendly and less clinical. They’ll have their say on all aspects of the service – from the decoration of the waiting area to interviewing potential new staff. In the future, the young people hope to link in with other local organisations, including the Youth Council.

Sally Trowse, ADHD Clinical Specialist Nurse with CAMHS who works closely with the forum, described it as a valuable tool to help young people have a voice in how the service evolves. She said: “The young people involved in the forum have already raised important issues and shared ideas on how they would like services to develop in the future.” To find out more about Stockport CAMHS visit http://www.withuinmind.nhs.uk

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My Shared Pathway – My Relationships Workbook

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My Shared Pathway – My Relationships Workbook

mysharedThe following extracts are from the ‘My Relationships’ workbook produced by My Shared Pathway:

“The relationships we have with other people are very important to our well-being and our recovery from mental health difficulties. We have relationships with many different people in many different areas of our life. We have relationships with our family, our friends, our neighbours, people who help support and care for us, all the professional people we come into contact with and, while in hospital, the other people we live with on the ward. We will probably have relationships with some professionals we might not have had relationships with befor

“All of our relationships have an effect on our lives, on how we feel and on how we behave. Those around us can have a very strong influence on us and our recovery from mental health difficulties. We will need to build relationships with people who understand where we’re coming from, how we are now and how we want to change. There may already be people in our lives that support us and we will need to make sure we maintain these. There may also be relationships that have a negative effect on us, and we may require help deciding what to do about these”

“In this part of My Shared Pathway, we’ll look at all your relationships, the ways you relate to other people and how to make sure your relationships are helpful to you in your recovery from mental health difficulties. We will look at how healthy, positive relationships can help reduce your harmful risks, while supporting you to take positive risks to live the lifestyle you want to lead.”

Click here to download the booklet in pdf format. Also, be sure to check out the Unique Recovery Journeys theme page of CAMHeleon. 

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