Tag Archive: model

The Secure Base Model

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A secure base is at the heart of any successful caregiving environment – whether within the birth family, in foster care, residential care or adoption. A secure base is provided through a relationship with one or more caregivers who offer a reliable base from which to explore and a safe haven for reassurance when there are difficulties. Thus a secure base promotes security, confidence, competence and resilience.

 

 

The Secure Base Model has been developed through a range of research and practice dissemination projects led by Gillian Schofield and Mary Beek in the Centre for Research on Children and Families at the University of East Anglia.

The Secure Base Model is drawn from attachment theory, and adapted to include an additional element, that of family membership, for children who are separated from their birth families. The model proposes five dimensions of caregiving, each of which is associated with a corresponding developmental benefit for the child. The dimensions overlap and combine with each other to create a secure base for the child, as represented below:

 

 

From: https://www.uea.ac.uk/providingasecurebase/home

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Interlinked with assessment skills is the ability to create a tailored formulation of the child/young person’s difficulties and to feedback the results of a treatment plan. (See UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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Staff need to ask about the family’s strengths as well as difficulties, so that interventions can build upon protective factors. (UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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Knowledge of the different contexts that surround the child/young person and family is crucial for reaching an understanding of their beliefs and behaviour. (UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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There is considerable value in families ‘informal’ reports regarding their problems and any changes they have noticed. However, it is good practice for practitioners to record changes systematically, using measures, questionnaires, or diaries. (UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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The ability to undertake a thorough assessment is crucial if the CAMHS worker is to understand the difficulties that concern the child/young person and family. A multidimensional assessment of the child/young person’s needs aims to analyse different aspects of the child/young person and family’s functioning, and combine information from different methods and types of source. (UCL CAMHS Competence model).

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Using a risk and resilience model, it becomes clear that there is huge potential for a family to influence a young person’s mental health.

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Patient and family-centred care (PFCC) enables healthcare organisations to work collaboratively with patients and their families to enhance and improve their care experiences. Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has implemented a PFCC model that is supported by a number of strategies including ‘shadowing’, which involves closely following patients and their families throughout their care experiences. http://tinyurl.com/k49a4d6

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Many of the CAMHS interventions with the strongest evidence base are delivered in a group format (such as parenting groups, and groups which teach problem solving and social skills). (UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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Ability of staff to know the limits of their competence and when to make use of support and supervision will be essential. (UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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