Tag Archive: practice

Animal-assisted Therapy

Read more

Animals are an important part of many people’s lives — their mere presence can contribute to human’s happiness, making their life more meaningful. However, animals may do more than just provide companionship.

New research suggests they can improve emotional, social and cognitive functioning in adolescents with severe mental disorders. The study, published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, examined the effects of animal-assisted therapy, which is an intervention involving guided interaction between a patient and a trained animal. The purpose of this intervention is to aid a patient’s recovery process.

“The young patients who feel fragile, needy and dependent on others in the hospital context, can experience themselves as caretakers of someone else in the [animal-assisted therapy] environment,” researchers said, according to The Pacific Standard. “This experience can improve their sense of self-agency and self-cure, and these positive effects are not only limited to the human-animal bond, but can be extended to the patient’s global functioning and to the entire process of care.”

Source: medicaldaily.com – Read more here

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

There is considerable value in families ‘informal’ reports regarding their problems and any changes they have noticed. However, it is good practice for practitioners to record changes systematically, using measures, questionnaires, or diaries. (UCL CAMHS Competence model)

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Supervision allows staff to keep their work focused and to maintain good practice.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

The following reflective activities are used when there’s a difficulty with transference: post shift debriefs, personal reflections, team meetings, frequent supervision, reflective practice groups, one-to-ones with another staff member.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Instilling fear in young people as a practice has negative consequences. It can produce yet more anger and resentment. It can intimidate and cause them to lose yet more confidence in themselves.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

It is important that staff teams are enabled to carry out reflective learning as this helps to maintain staff motivation and skills and improve practice. From https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/c07-tier4-ch-ado-mh-serv-child.pdf

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Sometimes clear, balanced, logical thinking is reliant on us being able to regulate our own emotions as staff members. It is possible with practice.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

The ward staff team meet for a reflective debrief at the end of each shift. We talk about what went well and how we could have done things better. We share our own feelings and responses to the day’s occurrences. A similar meeting takes place each week. The significance of reflective practice whilst doing work with young people cannot be emphasised enough.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

CAMHS staff need knowledge of professional and legal issues, and particularly the way in which these apply to clinical practice, assessment process, and to intervention: for example, legal frameworks, professional and ethical guidelines, issues of confidentiality, consent and capacity.

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example

Much clearer guidance is required with regard to the availability of written information for young people, especially with regard to the issue of consent to treatment. Good practice and learning on how to involve young users of CAMHS and their families in inpatient services needs to be disseminated to in-patient CAMHS. (See YoungMinds’ Where Next)

Read more

Please register or sign in to collect and save your favourite ideas and tools.

Submit your own ward example