Tag Archive: relationship

What Works to Enhance Inter-Parental Relationships and Improve Outcomes for Children?

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The Early Intervention Foundation have carried out a review of ‘What works to enhance inter-parental relationships and improve outcomes for children.

Key findings include:

  • The quality of the inter-parental relationship, specifically how parents communicate and relate to each other, is increasingly recognised as a primaryinfluence on effective parenting practices and children’s long-term mental health and future life chances.
  • Parents/couples who engage in frequent, intense and poorly resolved inter-parental conflicts put children’s mental health and long-term life chances at risk.
  • Children of all ages can be affected by destructive inter-parental conflict, with effects evidenced across infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood.
  • The context of the wider family environment is an important factor that can protect or exacerbate child outcomes in response to exposure to inter-parental conflict. In particular, levels of negativity and parenting practices can exacerbate or moderate the impact of inter-parental conflict on children.
  • Inter-parental conflict can adversely affect both the mother-child and father-child relationship, with evidence suggesting that the association between inter-parental conflict and negative parenting practices may be stronger for the father-child relationship compared to the mother-child relationship.

http://www.eif.org.uk/

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Staff use curiosity and open mindedness. Approach time with young person as an explorer, use listening skills, observation, see them as unique individual, establish trusting relationship.

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Therapeutic relationship seen as a vehicle for inspiring hope and nurturing the development of coping skills.

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The interpersonal relationship is, in and of itself, a way of inspiring hope.

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Staff take into account family history and current functioning: genetic and psychosocial factors, household composition, history of parent’s own childhood, life events, sibling relationships, parental strengths and difficulties, absent parents, separated parents relationship.

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Friendship is entering into a relationship. Friends do things for each other and listen to each other. Young people need to know how to be a giver, not just a taker, in the relationship. Staff can help them to find ways to support each other.

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Staff understand that at the heart of healthy child development is the child’s secure attachment relationship with their parents.

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Within the programme, breaks are seen as therapeutic opportunities. They allow young people to take a break from cognitive effort, they provide an opportunity for exercise, fresh air and fun, and they offer an opportunity to develop negotiation and relationship-building skills.

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As well as risks, nurses need to look for protective factors in a young person’s life or within the family such as, an extremely good relationship with a grandparent, enjoyment of school, good coping skills or having several close friends. Fromhttp://www.nursinginpractice.com/article/supporting-children-and-young-people-who-self-harm

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A lot of young people who are admitted feel very anxious at first, especially because they’re away from their parent or primary carer. Staff begin talking about this with the young person early on and provide lots of reassurance. After some time, they are usually able to engage in activities and conversations with others. An emphasis on positive engagement is crucial, forming a trusting relationship and managing this separation in a considerate and gradual way.

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