Tag Archive: respect

Mindfulness and mindful relationships give respect to the individuality of each person’s unique mind.

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“I believe there are five qualities that help youngsters move toward adulthood with the resources needed to find their passion, manage the obstacles that may get in their way, and persevere to making their dreams come true. These five qualities are resilience, self-respect, problem-solving, visioning, and gratitude.” (Susan Stiffelman, 2012).

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Young people are to respect staff, peers, belongings, rights to privacy, the environment, opinions and personal space at all times. And the same goes for staff.

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Having a flexible approach encourages the young people’s co-operation and respect.

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The role of unit staff is critical in affecting a positive culture…Effective training is essential for all staff about how to communicate with children and young people, how to treat them with dignity and respect even when their behaviour is challenging. From:http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmhealth/342/34209.htm

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Ward Community Rules Expectations

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Ward Community Rules Expectations (whereas rules are often one-sided and imposed, expectations are inclusive and promote a culture of mutual respect)

This is an example of an impressive list of social expectations everyone is encouraged to stick to. What’s truly fab about it is that young people themselves, working alongside staff, came up with it. Such an idea-generating activity can be a notably remedial and neutralising activity in its own right:

  • Be respectful to others.
  • No bullying behaviours.
  • Violence to others or property will not be accepted.
  • Attending your education sessions or purposeful activities.
  • Going to bed on time.
  • Looking after your personal hygiene and keeping your bedroom tidy.
  • We expect that everyone, both staff and young people, will treat everyone with respect and encourage positive interaction.
  • Use words to express the feeling or impulse, otherwise the ‘violence’ will be split off or acted out.

Source: tewv.nhs.uk – see more here

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The importance of affiliation, structure and autonomy support

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Study: The importance of affiliation, structure and autonomy support

Drawing on decades of evidence linking authoritative parenting to better mental health outcomes for children, a team of Montreal-based psychologists note how warm, nurturing parenting (‘affiliation’) and clear, consistent expectations and discipline (‘structure’) have been acknowledged as key components. But they argue that a third important dimension – parental respect for children’s own ideas, feelings and initiatives (‘autonomy support’) has received less attention than it deserves.

The results of their study showed that parental skills relating to structure and affiliation both increased significantly, following an intervention to introduce autonomy support into the parenting of a group of parents. There was also an increase in positive attitudes towards autonomy support, with parents making more use of relevant strategies. Parents reported that their child’s mental health had significantly improved and that problematic behaviour had reduced. Children’s feedback also suggested that their sense of happiness, self-esteem and life satisfaction had significantly improved too.

You can read more about their work here.

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respectful validation

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“We offer respectful validation of young peoples thoughts and emotions which enable them to identify the initial causes of their feelings. We help young people put coping strategies into place. We usually begin with a short chat and walk with them as they take small steps to tackle their problems. Along the way, they build up positive strategies which empower and give them more confidence.”

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Open communication, respect, accessibility

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“Units need to more actively involve the young people they care for, to develop work philosophies that encourage open communication and respect and which promote staff accessibility.”

 

See more in YoungMinds Where Next

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mutual respect

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“I find gaining a good rapport, which has mutual respect at the heart of it, comes from accepting a young person’s right to say what he or she has to say, no matter how we might internally judge it. Then I say what I have to say, I stand firm and am not blown away by their response. This kind of caring earns respect.”

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