Tag Archive: structure

The service ensures that the Care Programme Approach is implemented and used for all young people and forms the structure of care planning. The CPA format and documentation used must be appropriate for use with young people.

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We believe the clear structure of the timetable, with activities kept within time limits, offers young people the safety to explore their difficulties in a contained way.

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The ward programme and structure encourages the development of interpersonal and group skills.

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Generic group staff competences include an ability to plan the group structure and to recruit appropriate service users, as well as a capacity to engage group members and manage group process. (see UCL CAMHS Competence model)

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The Occupational Therapist works as part of the Multidisciplinary Team. Occupational Therapists are interested in how people structure their day, the activities they do and the skills and abilities they have.

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Evening and weekend activities

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“Young people can get involved in our evening and weekend activities including football, badminton, board games, arts and crafts, gym sessions, basketball, quiz nights, film nights and hair and beauty sessions. Staff work with them to draw up an individualised activity plan so they can structure their week and plan their time with us.”

 

 

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The importance of affiliation, structure and autonomy support

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Study: The importance of affiliation, structure and autonomy support

Drawing on decades of evidence linking authoritative parenting to better mental health outcomes for children, a team of Montreal-based psychologists note how warm, nurturing parenting (‘affiliation’) and clear, consistent expectations and discipline (‘structure’) have been acknowledged as key components. But they argue that a third important dimension – parental respect for children’s own ideas, feelings and initiatives (‘autonomy support’) has received less attention than it deserves.

The results of their study showed that parental skills relating to structure and affiliation both increased significantly, following an intervention to introduce autonomy support into the parenting of a group of parents. There was also an increase in positive attitudes towards autonomy support, with parents making more use of relevant strategies. Parents reported that their child’s mental health had significantly improved and that problematic behaviour had reduced. Children’s feedback also suggested that their sense of happiness, self-esteem and life satisfaction had significantly improved too.

You can read more about their work here.

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No sudden surprises or changes to diet plans

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“Young people always know what they are expected to eat and drink, and no sudden surprises or changes to their diet plan will occur during the meal.”

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Supervision choices

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A supervision structure that allows staff to ‘opt in’ and select the member of staff they wish to supervise them, or alternatively to have group supervision if they do not wish to meet on a one-to-one basis, the uptake of supervision has been significantly improved.

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An environment of learning

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Staff support groups and supervision  provide a time for staff to reflect on their working, and foster an environment of learning and dialogue between each other. Staff felt that this gave a forum to openly discuss problems and create strong relationships within the team.

From YoungMind’s Where Next 2 – view it here

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